FISHING SPECIES IN THE MARTEN RIVER SYSTEM

Species found in the Marten River water system. We are in Zone 11

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Walleye - Pickerel

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

For other uses, see Walleye (disambiguation).

Walleye
Walleye painting.jpg
 
Binomial name
Sander vitreus
(Mitchill, 1818)
 

Walleye (Sander vitreus, formerly Stizostedion vitreum) is a freshwater perciform fish native to most of Canada and to the Northern United States. It is a North American close relative of the European pikeperch. The walleye is sometimes called the yellow walleye to distinguish it from the blue walleye, which is a subspecies that can be found in the southernOntario and Quebec regions.[1]

In some parts of its range, the walleye is known as the walleyed pikecolored pikeyellow pike or pickerel (esp. in English-speaking Canada), although the fish is not related to other species of pikes which are members of the familyEsocidae.[2]

Walleyes show a fair amount of variation across watersheds. In general, fish within a watershed are quite similar and are genetically distinct from those of nearby watersheds. The species has been artificially propagated for over a century and has been planted on top of existing populations or introduced into waters naturally devoid of the species, sometimes reducing the overall genetic distinctiveness of populations.


 

 

 

 

 


Smallmouth bass

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Smallmouth bass
Smallmouth bass.png
Conservation status
 
Binomial name
Micropterus dolomieu
Lacépède, 1802

The smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) is a species of freshwater fish in the sunfish family (Centrarchidae) of the order Perciformes. It is thetype species of its genus. One of the black basses, it is a popular game fish sought by anglers throughout the temperate zones of North America, and has been spread by stock to many cool-water tributaries and lakes in Canada and more so introduced in the United States. It attains a length of up to 27 inches and 12 pounds. The smallmouth bass is native to the upper and middle Mississippi River basin, the Saint Lawrence RiverGreat Lakes system, and up into the Hudson Bay basin. Its common names include smallmouthbronzebackbrown bassbrownie,smalliebronze bass, and bareback bass.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Northern pike

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

This article is about the fish. For the Canadian band, see The Northern Pikes.

Northern pike (Esox lucius)
Esox lucius1.jpg
Northern pike
Conservation status
 
Binomial name
Esox lucius
Linnaeus1758
Distribution map of Esox lucius.png

The northern pike (Esox lucius), known simply as a pike in BritainIreland, most of Canada, and most parts of the USA, (also called jackfish or simply "northern" in the Upper Midwest of the USA and in Manitoba, Canada), is a species of carnivorous fish of the genus Esox (the pikes). They are typical of brackish and fresh waters of the Northern Hemisphere (i.e. holarctic in distribution). Pike grow to a relatively large size: the average length is about 70–120 cm (28–47 in). Even so, lengths of up to 150 cm (59 in) and weights of 25 kg (55 lb) are very rare. The heaviest specimen known so far was caught in 1983 at an abandoned stone quarry in Germany, where the species is called Hecht. This specimen was 147 cm (58 in) long and weighed 31 kg (68 lb). The longest pike ever recorded and confirmed was 152 cm (60 in) long and weighed 28 kg (62 lb). A pike of 60.5 in (154 cm) was caught and released in May 2004 in Apisko Lake, Manitoba. Historic reports of giant pike, caught in nets in Ireland in the late 19th century, of 41–42 kg (90–93 lb) with a length of 173–175 cm (67–68 in), were researched by Fred Buller and published in The Domesday Book of Mammoth Pike. Neither Britain nor Ireland has managed to produce much in the way of giant pike in the last 50 years, so substantial doubt exists surrounding those earlier claims. Currently, the IGFA recognizes a 25-kg pike caught by Lothar Louis in Lake of Grefeern, Germany, on 16 October 1986, as the all-tackle world-record northern pike.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Lake trout
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

For the band, see Lake Trout (band). For the Baltimore food item, see Culture of Baltimore#Lake Trout.

Lake trout
Lake trout fishes salvelinus namaycush.jpg
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Salmoniformes
Family: Salmonidae
Genus: Salvelinus
Species: S. namaycush
Binomial name
Salvelinus namaycush
(Walbaum, 1792)[1]

Lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) is a freshwater char living mainly in lakes in northern North America. Other names for it include mackinaw,lake char (or charr), touladitogue, and grey trout. In Lake Superior, it can also be variously known as siscowetpaperbelly and lean. The lake trout is prized both as a game fish and as a food fish.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perch

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

This article is about the genus of fish. For other uses, see Perch (disambiguation)"Perches" redirects here. For the municipality in Haiti, see Perches, Nord-Est."The Perch" redirects here. For the pub in Binsey, Oxfordshire, see The Perch (Binsey).

Perch
YellowPerch.jpg
Yellow perch (Perca flavescens)
 

Perch is a common name for fish of the genus Perca, freshwater gamefish belonging to the family Percidae. The perch, of which there are three species in different geographical areas, lend their name to a large order of vertebrates: the Perciformes, from the Greek perkemeaning spotted, and the Latin forma meaning shape. Many species of freshwater gamefish more or less resemble perch, but belong to different genera. In fact, the exclusively saltwater dwelling red drum is often referred to as a red perch, though by definition perch are freshwater fish. Though many fish are referred to as perch as a common name, to be considered a true perch, the fish must be of the family Percidae.

 

 

 

 

 


Catfish

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 

"Kaari" redirects here. For other uses, see Catfish (disambiguation) and Kaari (disambiguation).

Catfish
Temporal range: Late Cretaceous – present
Ameiurus melas by Duane Raver.png
Black bullhead
 

Catfishes (order Siluriformes) are a diverse group of ray-finned fish. Named for their prominent barbels, which resemble a cat's whiskers, catfish range in size and behavior from the heaviest and longest, the Mekong giant catfishfrom Southeast Asia and the second longest, the wels catfish of Eurasia, to detritivores (species that eat dead material on the bottom), and even to a tiny parasitic species commonly called the candiruVandellia cirrhosa. There are armour-plated types and there are also naked types, neither having scales. Despite their name, not all catfish have prominent barbel. Members of the Siluriformes order are defined by features of the skull and swimbladder. Catfish are of considerable commercial importance; many of the larger species are farmed or fished for food. Many of the smaller species, particularly the genus Corydoras, are important in the aquarium hobby. Many catfish are nocturnal,[2][3] but others (many Auchenipteridae) are crepuscular or diurnal (most Loricariidae or Callichthyidae for example).

 

 


Lake whitefish

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
 
 
Lake whitefish
Lake whitefish1.jpg
Conservation status
Not evaluated (IUCN 3.1)
 
Binomial name
Coregonus clupeaformis
(Mitchill, 1818)

The lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) is a species of freshwater whitefish from North America. Lake whitefish are found throughout much of Canada and parts of the northern United States, including all of the Great Lakes. The lake whitefish is sometimes referred to as a "humpback" fish due to the small size of the head in relation to the length of the body.[1] It is a valuable commercial fish, and also occasionally taken by sport fishermen. Smoked, refrigerated, vacuum-packed lake whitefish fillets are available in North American grocery stores. Other vernacular names used for this fish include Sault whitefishgizzard fishcommon whitefish, eastern whitefish, Great Lakes whitefish, humpback whitefish, inland whitefish and whitefish.[2] The scientific genus name Coregonus (co-regg'-on-us) means "angle eye" in Greek and the species name clupeaformis means "herring-shaped" in Latin.[1]